Advice on how to travel safely

Revised Protection Levels for local authorities across Scotland are in force from Saturday 5 June. 

Read about the local protection levels and what is permitted in your area.

Information on travel within Scotland, to the rest of the UK and around the world can be found in the Scottish Government's travel guidance.

Know before you go - always plan ahead and avoid busy routes and places. Check live travel information -  use Traffic Scotland for roads, ScotRail for rail and Traveline Scotland for bus travel.

Remember, public transport capacity continues to be limited, help those who need it most by staying local as much as possible.

Please follow these steps for your own safety and the safety of others

  • Stay at home if you or anyone in your household is experiencing coronavirus symptoms (new continuous dry cough, fever or the loss of or a change in your sense of smell or taste) or if you are self-isolating.
  • Familiarise yourself with the Scottish Government's updated Strategic Framework guidance and where your local authority sits within the updated local protection levels and follow the relevant travel advice.
  • Familiarise yourself with Scottish Government test and protect guidance and consider downloading the free contact tracing app.
  • Stay local as much as possible for goods, services and activities and  continue to work from home where you can.
  • Consider walking, wheeling or cycling, if you can, to reduce pressure on the road network and on public transport where capacity will be limited.
  • Plan your journey and leave additional time due to temporary restrictions or changes to previous timetables or schedules.
  • Pay for your journey online, use smart ticketing, the operator’s mobile app, or contactless payment, if you can, to reduce cash handling.
  • Comply with any signage or instructions on public transport or from transport staff as the safety measures in place are for everyone’s benefit.
  • When travelling on public transport or in a taxi or private hire vehicle or when you are in a bus or railway station, enclosed ferry terminal or airport you must wear a face covering.
  • You should not share a vehicle with anyone from another household, unless you absolutely have to.
  • Travel to islands is permitted, provided that this is allowed within the local protection levels in force at the journey origin and destination and in line with all other guidance.
  • Be considerate of the impact of restrictions on the needs of fellow passengers who may have impairments, disabilities or mobility issues
  • Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water or use a hand sanitiser before and after every transport journey.

Thank you for your patience and understanding during these difficult times.

Introduction

This guidance contains advice on how to be safe when walking, wheeling (wheeling refers to travelling by wheelchair), cycling, or travelling in private vehicles or on public transport during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak in Scotland.

This guidance came into effect immediately on 26 May 2020 and will be reviewed regularly and, if necessary, updated on the Transport Scotland website.

Our updated Strategic Framework, published on 23 February 2021 and timetable for easing restrictions, published on 16 March 2021, set out how we’ll gradually and safely move out of lockdown.

On 13 April details on accelerating the easing of restrictions and updated local protection levels were published.

These updated local protection levels underpin the Strategic Framework and you should review both to see how the restrictions applicable within the various protection levels may affect your travel.

Travel between Scotland and the rest of the UK, Ireland, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man

Unrestricted travel is allowed between Scotland and England, Wales, Northern Ireland, the Channel Islands, and the Isle of Man – with the exception of any areas of Scotland in Level 3 or Level 4.

Restrictions remain on travel to the remaining part of the Common Travel Area, the Republic of Ireland, but will be kept under review. For the reasonable excuses to travel to/from the Republic of Ireland and Scotland, you should check the relevant exceptions for travel (both Scottish exceptions as well as those for Ireland and any additional rules that may be in place).

You can find coronavirus travel information for other parts of the Common Travel Area here:

These rules will be kept under review and if the prevalence of the virus in all, or part of, any of these countries reduces it may be possible to relax these restrictions for some areas.

Keep yourself and others safe by following this advice

Before you make any travel plans you should consider the following two questions:

1. Should I travel?

You should stay at home if you:

  • are experiencing any coronavirus symptoms or
  • are self-isolating as a result of coronavirus symptoms or sharing a household with somebody with symptoms

Read more information and guidance from Health Protection Scotland.

2. Is my journey necessary?

Before you travel, you should consider if your journey is necessary and in accordance with the guidance set out in the Strategic Framework on protection levels, particularly for those in or entering into levels 3 and 4. This will ensure the transport network can keep running and allows people who need to make essential journeys to travel.

In order to ease demand on the transport network, we encourage you to access goods, services and activities within your local area as much as possible by walking, wheeling or cycling if you can.  Please plan ahead, timing your journey to avoid busy times and please think about your need to use public transport while capacity is constrained.

If the answers to both the questions above are Yes then we ask you to consider what form of transport you will use for your journey.

In order to reduce pressure on the road network and the public transport system we would like you to consider walking, wheeling or cycling for all or part of your journey, if you can. We encourage these forms of active travel as a first choice, as they are good for health, the environment and to relieve pressure on the transport network.


Walking, wheeling and cycling

We continue to encourage you to stay within your local area, for exercise or other leisure activities if you can.

If you decide to walk or cycle, information from your local authority or Sustrans (the national charity for walking and cycling) can help you plan your journey, including maps showing dedicated paths and routes. If cycling, you should check any changes to routes in case of any temporary traffic or road restrictions.

Active travel and accessibility organisations have come together to provide information and best practice on walking and cycling during COVID-19. This information has also been approved by Public Health Scotland and Transport Scotland and is available on the Sustrans Scotland webpage.

When walking, wheeling or cycling you should follow the Highway Code to keep everyone safe.  In particular:

  • only pedestrians - including people using wheelchairs and mobility scooters - should use the pavement.
  • cyclists should only cycle on designated cycle lanes,  shared paths and roads.
  • on shared, non-segregated paths, all users should be considerate of each other. Cyclists should use a bell to warn of their presence but be mindful that a bell may not be sufficient warning to pedestrians with hearing, visual or mobility impairments.

When walking or wheeling you must maintain a 2-metre physical distance from anyone who is not from your household. If you meet with other households, please do not exceed the limit of the number of people allowed to meet in your local area.

You should wash or sanitise your hands before and after walking or wheeling in case you inadvertently touch any hard surfaces or other pedestrians or persons wheeling. We also recommend that you clean your wheelchair in case it is touched by another person when wheeling.

When cycling you should maintain physical distancing. You should wash or sanitise your hands before and after cycling. We also recommend that you wash your cycle in case it is touched by another person whilst either cycling or at your destination.

If you are unable to walk or cycle on your journey, the following sections provide advice on the use of private and public transport.


Bus, Rail, Glasgow Subway, Edinburgh Tram

Plan your journey

We continue to encourage you to stay within your local area, for exercise or other leisure activities if you can.

The public transport system continues to have limited capacity due to physical distancing and lower service provision. Therefore please think carefully about whether you need to use public transport for travel to exercise, meet friends and family or any other leisure activities.

It is important that you plan your journey and check with Traveline Scotland or your transport operator for the latest travel advice on your route. Your transport operator will also have information on the measures they have put in place to ensure your safety when travelling.

It is possible that travel may take longer than normal on some routes due to reduced capacity and physical distancing measures. You should therefore allow sufficient time especially if your journey involves changes between different forms of transport.

You are advised to plan ahead by identifying alternative routes and options in case of unexpected disruption.

If you can, you should travel at off-peak times which are likely to be less busy. If you are travelling to work your employer may agree alternative or flexible working hours to enable you to travel at less busy times.

Where possible, you should book your travel online through your transport provider’s ticketing app, smartcard or website. If you are unable to pay for tickets online you should consider contactless payment, if you can, or have the correct money available.

You should adhere to physical distancing from people who are not in your household if you are walking to a station or bus stop. You should also adhere to physical distancing whilst on public transport, at stations, terminals and stops. When staying 2 metres apart may not be possible, you should wear a face covering, unless exempt, keep the time you spend with others as short as possible and avoid physical contact.

We recommend you wash or sanitise your hands before starting and after finishing your journey.

On your journey – staying safe

During the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak some routes may have less space available than usual due to physical distancing measures or changes to previous timetables or schedules.

You should try to maintain physical distancing from others. There may be situations where this is not possible, for example when boarding or alighting, on busier services, busier times of the day and when walking through interchanges. If you cannot maintain physical distancing from others, you should avoid physical contact and keep the time you spend with others as short as possible.

If you are travelling with members of your household you should sit together where possible as that will free up space for other passengers.

You must wear a face covering when using public transport to prevent the transmission of the virus unless exempt. These include children under 5 years of age or those with particular health conditions who cannot wear face coverings safely. You do not have to prove that you are exempt to access places or services, you should not be made to wear a face-covering or denied access to places where face coverings are required.

You may remove your face covering if you need to take medication or to eat or drink where reasonably necessary. You should remove your face covering temporarily to comply with a request by a relevant person, such as a ticket examiner who needs to check identity in respect, for example, of a concessionary card.

You are expected to provide your own face covering. A face covering does not have to be a surgical or other medical-grade mask but must be a facial covering that securely covers your mouth, nose and chin. It is recommended that it be made of cloth or other textiles and should be two, and preferably three, layers thick and fit snugly while allowing you to breathe easily. Scarfs and religious face coverings that cover the mouth and the nose count as face coverings for these purposes. It will not be acceptable to pull a shirt, blouse, jumper or coat up to try and cover your nose and mouth. Likewise, face shields are not considered face coverings. You should wash or sanitise your hands before and after you apply or remove your face covering, and avoid touching your face. After each use, you must wash a fabric covering at 60 degrees centigrade or dispose of it safely.

If you are not wearing a face covering without a reasonable excuse, you will be in breach of the law and may be liable, on summary conviction, to pay a fine.

When travelling comply with any signage or instructions on public transport or from transport staff as the safety measures in place are for everyone’s benefit. Signs and notices may include information about:

  • which seats to use or how to queue
  • any physical restrictions such as screens and barriers or floor markings
  • requests to board through different doors or to move to less busy areas
  • the reduced number of passengers allowed on vehicles because of physical distancing measures.

Face Covering Exemption Cards

If you would feel more comfortable showing something that says that you are exempt, you can request a face covering exemption card.  The exemption card, physical or digital, is available via the free helpline 0800 121 6240 or online contact form via Disability Equality Scotland at www.exempt.scot.

You will be required to confirm that you have you read the Scottish Government Guidance on face coverings and that you are exempt before your request will be processed. The digital card cannot be downloaded from the website and will be sent to you via an email attachment or by post.

These cards can be presented as proof of exemption in Scotland and across the rest of the UK. Other exemption cards such as the UK Government exemption card, Thistle card and Sunflower lanyard are still valid as proof of exemption.

Be considerate to your fellow passengers and to transport staff:

  • wait for passengers to get off first before you board
  • do not congregate near entrances, exits, under canopies, at bus stops, on platforms or outside of stations
  • be prepared to queue or take a different entrance or exit at stations
  • respect other people’s space while travelling
  • be aware of the impact of restrictions on the needs of fellow passengers who may have impairments, disabilities or mobility issues
  • do not eat or drink, unless necessary on a long journey
  • remember to take all your belongings and not leave any rubbish on tables or seats or other public areas.

If you cannot safely keep your distance on board a bus, train or tram, please wait for the next service. The bus driver, train staff or tram staff may have to ask you to wait for the next service, even when it does not appear necessary, due to reduced capacity and physical distancing measures. Your understanding and patience if this occurs will be appreciated by staff and your fellow passengers.

When travelling be aware of the surfaces you touch. Be careful not to touch your face and remember to cover your mouth with a tissue or elbow when coughing or sneezing. If you have hand sanitiser, it is recommended you use it before, throughout and after your journey, particularly where you are likely to touch surfaces.

Seek assistance if you need it

If you require assistance when travelling and would normally contact your transport operator ahead of time, continue to do so, so they can prepare accordingly.

If any problems arise or you feel ill during your journey, speak to a member of transport staff. In the case of an emergency, contact the emergency services as you normally would.

If you need help, maintain physical distancing from members of staff. If this isn’t possible, you should wear a face covering, unless exempt, try to avoid physical contact, if possible, and keep the time you spend with members of staff as short as possible.

Children

Physical distancing applies to children as well as adults. Children should maintain physical distancing from others who are not in their household. If this isn’t possible they should avoid physical contact and keep the time spent with others as short as possible. They should also wear a face covering, unless exempt.

If you are the responsible adult or carer travelling with children, please try to ensure that children observe physical distancing.

The Scottish Government has produced specific guidance on preparing for the start of the new school term in August 2020 which includes guidance around school transport. Passengers on public transport should be mindful that operators may designate specific zones for school children where physical distancing will not be required.

Completing your journey

When finishing your journey, you should deposit any of your used tissues, disposable face coverings or rubbish in bins. We recommend you wash or sanitise your hands (and children’s hands if you are travelling with them) as soon as possible.


Travelling by Ferry

Plan your journey

Travel to islands is permitted, provided that this is allowed within the local protection levels in force at the journey origin and destination, and in line with all other guidance.

Ferry services vary significantly across Scotland from short crossings with small passenger-only vessels to long overnight crossings with cabins. Therefore, you should check with your ferry operator about the specific measures that they have put in place to ensure your safety when travelling.

It is essential that you plan your journey and check with Traveline Scotland or your ferry operator for the latest travel advice on your route. Please also check the arrangements for your journey to the port and onwards on the island, including subsequent ferries, as there may be adjustments, capacity limits and longer connecting times.

Access to our islands for island residents and key workers, such as NHS staff, is essential and we have put measures in place to support this where possible.

Advanced booking will be required on many routes and if you arrive at the port without a booking you may not be permitted to travel. Where possible, book your travel online through your transport provider’s website. If you are unable to pay for tickets online you should check whether contactless or cash payments will be available before travelling to your port of embarkation.

Pre-departure coronavirus testing for those visiting a Scottish island

To reduce the risk of coronavirus being brought into island communities by people who are unaware they are infectious, the Scottish Government is encouraging anyone planning to travel to a Scottish island to test before they do so

On your journey – staying safe

Travel is not permitted if you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19.

You, and any children in your care, should try to maintain at least 2 metres physical distancing from other passengers who are not from your household and from the staff at all times. If any problems or emergencies arise or you feel ill during your journey, speak to a staff member at the earliest opportunity when you can safely do so. When travelling, it is essential that you comply with any signage or instructions on the ferry or from staff, as the various safety measures are in place are for everyone’s benefit and safety.

Please remember to sanitise your hands before, during and on completion of your journey.

Signs and notices may include information about:

  • which seats to use or how to queue
  • any physical restrictions such as screens, barriers or floor markings
  • requests to move to less busy areas
  • the reduced number of passengers allowed on vessels because of physical distancing measures

Be considerate to your fellow passengers and to staff:

  • follow instructions from vessel and port staff while boarding or disembarking
  • do not congregate near entrances and exits,
  • be prepared to queue
  • respect other people’s space while travelling
  • be aware of the impact of restrictions on the needs of fellow passengers who may have impairments, disabilities or mobility issues
  • remember to take all your belongings and not leave any rubbish on tables or seats or other public areas.

You must wear a face covering when travelling by ferry service or in an enclosed ferry terminal. You must follow the instructions on board the vessel, these instructions will inform you if a face covering is not required. For example, face coverings may not be required in outdoor areas of the vessel or where physical distancing can be maintained due to the size and configuration of the vessel. For children under 5 years of age or those with particular health conditions who cannot wear a face covering safely, an exemption applies. You do not have to prove that you are exempt to access places or services, you should not be made to wear a face covering or denied access to places where face coverings are required.

You may remove your face covering if you need to take medication or to eat or drink where reasonably necessary. You should remove your face covering temporarily to comply with a request by a relevant person, such as a ticket examiner who needs to check identity in respect, for example, of a concessionary card.

You are expected to provide your own face covering. A face covering does not have to be a surgical or other medical-grade mask but must be a facial covering that securely covers your mouth, nose and chin. It is recommended that it be made of cloth or other textiles and should be two, and preferably three, layers thick and fit snugly while allowing you to breathe easily. Scarfs and religious face coverings that cover the mouth and the nose count as face coverings for these purposes. It will not be acceptable to pull a shirt, blouse, jumper or coat up to try and cover your nose and mouth. Likewise, face shields are not considered face coverings.

You should wash or sanitise your hands before and after you apply or remove your face covering, and avoid touching your face. After each use, you must wash a fabric face covering at 60 degrees centigrade or dispose of it safely.

If you are not wearing a face covering without a reasonable excuse, you will be in breach of the law and may be liable, on summary conviction, to pay a fine.

When travelling, be aware of the surfaces you touch. Be careful not to touch your face, and remember to cover your mouth with a tissue or elbow when coughing or sneezing. If you have your hand sanitiser, it is recommended you use it before, throughout and after your journey, particularly where you are likely to touch surfaces.

When travelling comply with any signage or instructions on the ferry or from staff as the safety measures in place are for everyone’s benefit.

Face Covering Exemption Cards

If you would feel more comfortable showing something that says that you are exempt, you can request a face covering exemption card. The exemption card, physical or digital, is available via the free helpline 0800 121 6240 or online contact form via Disability Equality Scotland at www.exempt.scot.

You will be required to confirm that you have you read the Scottish Government Guidance on face coverings and that you are exempt before your request will be processed. The digital card cannot be downloaded from the website and will be sent to you via an email attachment or by post.

These cards can be presented as proof of exemption in Scotland and across the rest of the UK. Other exemption cards such as the UK Government exemption card, Thistle card and Sunflower lanyard are still valid as proof of exemption.


Taxis and Private Hire vehicles

On your journey

At taxi ranks you should try to maintain physical distancing from others. If you cannot, you should wear a face covering, unless exempt, avoid physical contact and keep the time you spend with others as short as possible.

You must wear a face covering when using a taxi or private hire vehicle to prevent the transmission of the virus. For children under 5 years of age or those with particular health conditions who cannot wear a face covering safely, an exemption applies. You do not have to prove that you are exempt to access places or services, you should not be made to wear a face covering or denied access to places where face coverings are required. 

You may remove your face covering if you need to take medication or to eat or drink, if permissible in the vehicle and where reasonably necessary.

You are expected to provide your own face covering. A face covering does not have to be a surgical or other medical-grade mask but must be a facial covering that securely covers your mouth, nose and chin. It is recommended that it be made of cloth or other textiles and should be two, and preferably three, layers thick and fit snugly while allowing you to breathe easily. Scarfs and religious face coverings that cover the mouth and the nose count as face coverings for these purposes. It will not be acceptable to pull a shirt, blouse, jumper or coat up to try and cover your nose and mouth. Likewise, face shields are not considered face coverings.

You should wash or sanitise your hands before and after you apply or remove your face covering, and avoid touching your face. After each use, you must wash a fabric face covering at 60 degrees centigrade or dispose of it safely.

If you are not wearing a face covering without a reasonable excuse, you will be in breach of the law and may be liable, on summary conviction, to pay a fine.

You should also be aware of the surfaces, like door handles, you or others touch. Ensure you wash or sanitise your hands before, during and after you journey. Also remember to cover your mouth with a tissue or elbow when coughing or sneezing.

Be considerate to your driver by taking all your belongings and rubbish when leaving the vehicle.

Face Covering Exemption Cards

If you would feel more comfortable showing something that says that you are exempt, you can request a face covering exemption card. The exemption card, physical or digital, is available via the free helpline 0800 121 6240 or online contact form via Disability Equality Scotland at www.exempt.scot.

You will be required to confirm that you have you read the Scottish Government Guidance on face coverings and that you are exempt before your request will be processed. The digital card cannot be downloaded from the website and will be sent to you via an email attachment or by post.

These cards can be presented as proof of exemption in Scotland and across the rest of the UK. Other exemption cards such as the UK Government exemption card, Thistle card and Sunflower lanyard are still valid as proof of exemption.

Plan your journey

It is important that you plan your journey. Taxi and Private Hire Vehicle operators may have put in place new measures to help with physical distancing. You should check what new measures apply. You may wish to confirm payment arrangements to avoid, if possible, cash transactions.

We recommend before starting your journey you wash or sanitise your hands.

Completing your journey

When finishing your journey, you should deposit any of your used tissues, disposable face coverings or rubbish in bins. We recommend you wash or sanitise your hands (and children’s hands if you are travelling with them) as soon as possible.


Private vehicles and car sharing

You should not share a vehicle with anyone from another household, unless you absolutely have to. It is recognised that people with additional support needs may need to car share and in these circumstances, they should also follow the appropriate measures, steps and precautions where possible.

If this is the case, you should take the following steps and precautions:

  • if sharing a vehicle with anyone from another household, limit the number of people in the vehicle to as few as possible, ideally no more than 2 (applies to adults and children aged 12 and over)
  • use the biggest vehicle available for car sharing purposes
  • occupants should sit as far apart as possible, ideally the passenger should sit in the back seat diagonally opposite the driver, aiming for 2 metre distancing between occupants
  • windows in the car should be opened as far as possible taking account of weather conditions to improve ventilation in the space
  • occupants in the car, including the driver, should wear a face covering provided it does not compromise driver safety in any way
  • occupants should perform hand hygiene before entering the vehicle and again on leaving the vehicle
  • occupants should avoid eating in the vehicle
  • passengers in the vehicle should minimise any surfaces touched
  • keep the volume of any music/radio to a minimum to prevent the need to raise voices in the car
  • the longer the journey, the higher the risk; keep journey times to the minimum feasible and do not linger in the vehicle before or after the journey itself
  • where non-household members are car-sharing, the car must be cleaned regularly (at least daily) and particular attention should be paid to high risk touch points such as door handles, electronic buttons and seat belts. General purpose detergent is sufficient unless a symptomatic or confirmed case of COVID-19 has been in the vehicle in which case a disinfectant (e.g. chlorine-based product) should be used

You should not travel to work/car share if you have any symptoms of coronavirus, as outlined on the NHS Inform website. 

Note this is relation to private vehicles, for taxis and private hire vehicles please refer to guidance on taxis and private hire vehicles.

If you are travelling in a vehicle as part of your job or business, safe operation of workplaces applies, therefore please refer to your employer. For employers, you may wish to refer to guidance for safer workplaces.

If someone tests positive for COVID-19, all passengers will be assessed for close contact and are likely to be advised to self-isolate.

For further information please visit our advice on how to travel safely.

Plan your journey

We encourage you to stay within your local area,  for shopping and other personal business, where possible. Consider walking, wheeling or cycling, if you can, to reduce pressure on the road network.  

If you are using a private vehicle (e.g. car, minibus) make sure that you plan ahead and check the latest travel advice on your route via Traffic Scotland, if you can, as well as making sure that your intended  car park is open. Otherwise, if parking on-street please be considerate of the local area and residents.

Routes may be different as local authorities make changes to enable physical distancing on pavements and cycle routes.

On your journey

When driving, you should anticipate more pedestrians and cyclists than usual, especially at peak times of day. You should allow other road users to maintain physical distancing by, for example, giving cyclists room at traffic lights.

You should limit the time you spend at garages, petrol stations and motorway services. You should maintain physical distancing from others and pay by contactless methods, if possible. When it is not possible to stay 2-metres apart from others, you should wear a face covering, unless exempt.

You should wash or sanitise your hands before, during and after your journey and if you are the driver you should encourage passengers to do likewise. You should also be aware of the surfaces you touch, be careful not to touch your face, and remember to cover your mouth with a tissue or elbow when coughing or sneezing.

Completing your journey

When finishing your journey, we recommend you wash or sanitise your hands as soon as possible and ensure regular cleaning of keys or fobs, door handles and steering wheel.


Air travel

Separate guidance relating to airports and aviation is available from the airline you are travelling with or your travel agent. Please also check the websites of the airport you will be departing from, and the airport you will be arriving at.

In Scotland you must wear a face covering when in an airport or on an airplane departing from or landing in Scotland. For children under 5 years of age or those with particular health conditions who cannot wear a face covering safely, an exemption applies. You do not have to prove that you are exempt to access places or services, you should not be made to wear a face covering or denied access to places where face coverings are required.

You may remove your face covering if you need to take medication or to eat or drink where reasonably necessary. You should remove your face covering temporarily to comply with a request by a relevant person who needs to check your identity.

You are expected to provide your own face covering. A face covering does not have to be a surgical or other medical-grade mask but must be a facial covering that securely covers your mouth, nose and chin. It is recommended that it be made of cloth or other textiles and should be two, and preferably three, layers thick and fit snugly while allowing you to breathe easily. Scarfs and religious face coverings that cover the mouth and the nose count as face coverings for these purposes. It will not be acceptable to pull a shirt, blouse, jumper or coat up to try and cover your nose and mouth. Likewise, face shields are not considered face coverings.

You should wash or sanitise your hands before and after you apply or remove your face covering, and avoid touching your face. After each use, you must wash a fabric face covering at 60 degrees centigrade or dispose of it safely.

If you are not wearing a face covering without a reasonable excuse, you will be in breach of the law and may be liable, on summary conviction, to pay a fine.

When travelling, be aware of the surfaces you touch. Be careful not to touch your face, and remember to cover your mouth with a tissue or elbow when coughing or sneezing. If you have your hand sanitiser, it is recommended you use it before, throughout and after your journey, particularly where you are likely to touch surfaces.


International travel

If travelling abroad is essential, make sure you check the latest Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) advice before travelling. Check with your travel agent or your airline, ferry or train operator on specific rules for each route and destination.

Bear in mind that quarantine rules may apply in the country you are visiting and when you return to the UK.

Find further advice on the UK Government website.


Summary of latest changes

Summary of latest changes

26 April 2021

  • Updated text on new travel rules and further detail added to car sharing guidance for those with additional support needs

16 April 2021

  • Updated text around new travel rules, Scottish Government calendar for easing restrictions and FACTS guidance

8 January 2021

  • Updated text to reflect new lockdown restrictions

2 November 2020

  • Updated text around UK travel

30 October 2020

  • Strategic Framework Guidance
  • Face Covering Exemption Cards

23 September 2020

  • Contact tracing app

22 September 2020

  • Further update to car/vehicle sharing

8 September 2020

  • Update to car/vehicle sharing

26 August 2020

  • Guidance on preparing for the start of the new school term - link updated

3 August 2020

  • School guidance added

10 July 2020

 

  • Guidance on car sharing added

6 July 2020

  • Updates on 5 mile guidance and ferry travel

22 June 2020

  • Face coverings – clarification on exemption evidence and addition of a link to exemption legislation

19 June 2020

  • Face coverings – Following the First Minister's announcement that face coverings will be mandatory on public transport from 22 June 2020,  the guidance has been updated in the “steps to follow” and in the relevant sections for each transport mode.
  • How to make a face covering - link provided
  • Aviation guidance – The UK Government published its guidance on 11 June 2020, a link has been provided to the passenger guidance.
  • Contact details – An e-mail address has been provided for the submission of comments on this guidance.