Annex B Summary of STPR Work Packages

B.1 The Strategic Transport Projects Review (STPR) has been developed over the course of five distinct work packages.

  • Review Current and Future Network Performance;
  • Determine Expectations, Gaps and Shortfalls;
  • Identify Potential Interventions and Sift Options;
  • Appraise Candidate Interventions; and
  • Strategic Environmental Assessment.

Review Current and Future Network Performance

B.2 In this work package, the strategic transport network was categorised, for the purpose of assessment, into 20 corridors, 4 urban networks (Glasgow, Edinburgh, Dundee and Aberdeen), and two strategic nodes (Perth and Inverness). This division offers the ability to address the most important impacts of each on the strategic transport network, while also offering the ability to compare results and offer an assessment applicable on a national basis.

B.3 The historic and current performance of each element was then assessed using the Transport model for Scotland (TMfS) against the three key strategic outcomes in the National Transport Strategy (NTS):

  • Improve journey times and connections, to tackle congestion and the lack of integration and connections in transport;
  • Reduce emissions, to tackle the issues of climate change, air quality and health improvement; and
  • Improve quality, accessibility and affordability, to give people a choice of public transport, where availability means better quality transport services and value for money or an alternative to the car.

B.4 The expected future performance of the network up to the year 2022 was forecast, based on demand forecasts by mode and corridor/network/node.

B.5 Effective transport is a key to supporting the delivery of the Government Economic Strategy. This work package concluded that for the most part, the transport network performed to a high standard and generally within its capacity, but a number of significant areas would require specific attention, including:

  • A forecast increase in congestion in central Scotland, particularly around Edinburgh. This impacts on the connectivity between Scotland’s major urban centres and the journey time reliability required to support business sustainability and growth;
  • The relative isolation of places outside of the Central Belt, of cities such as Aberdeen and Inverness (in spite of demand growth driven by urban regeneration and development in areas relatively remote from the Central Belt), and greater isolation for the more remote peripheral areas and islands. This impacts on the access to key services required to support the solidarity and cohesion aims;
  • A public transport network which served existing flows adequately, but which could perform better in terms of accessibility and integration; and
  • A forecast growth in emissions resulting from growth in private car usage and a significant increase in freight transport by road.

B.6 The focus of the remaining work packages has been on finding effective solutions to meet these challenges, ensuring that the transport system plays its full role in helping to deliver the Scottish Government’s Strategic Objectives and overall Purpose to promote sustainable economic growth for Scotland.

Determine Expectations, Gaps and Shortfalls

B.7 This work package interpreted the findings from the review of current network performance. It did so by considering the findings from that review in the context of their potential impact on achieving national strategic objectives, derived from the Government Economic Strategy, National Transport Strategy etc. It assessed their significance, and developed a portfolio of specific objectives for the corridors, nodes and networks.

B.8 The following national and corridor/network/node based objectives were identified. These objectives are designed to be consistent with the process of addressing expectations, gaps and shortfalls for the strategic transport network as a whole. The performance of the corridors, networks and nodes were considered in light of the national objectives. This informed the development of the corridor/network/node objectives.

National

  • Promote ‘competitive’ inter-urban journey times;
  • Reduce inter-urban journey time on public transport;
  • Promote journey time reduction on the trunk road network for prioritised vehicles and users (e.g. high occupancy vehicles, freight, bus) where STAG appraisal demonstrates that a strong economic case can be balanced with environmental objectives. Elsewhere on the trunk road network provide improvements to journey time reliability;
  • Promote journey time reductions between the central belt and Aberdeen/Inverness primarily to allow business to achieve an effective working day when travelling between these centres;
  • Maximise the labour catchment area in city regions where economic evidence demonstrates that this is required (favouring public transport and high occupancy vehicles and balancing with other policy measures that promote reduction in need to travel i.e. planning policy);
  • Support the development and implementation of relevant proposed national developments identified in the NPF2;
  • Reduce CO2 emissions per person km;
  • Stabilise total CO2 emissions;
  • Reduce CO2 emissions in line with expectations from the [then] emerging climate change bill;
  • To promote continuing reduction in accident rates and severity rates across the strategic transport network, recognising the need to continue the work of the Strategic Road Safety Plan through the STPR period;
  • Promote seamless travel;
  • Improve the competitiveness of public transport relative to the car; and
  • Improve overall perceptions of public transport.

Aberdeen

  • To improve accessibility, primarily by public transport, to and between the City Centre, Dyce, the airport and South East Aberdeen;
  • To promote continuing reduction in accident rates and severity rates across the strategic transport network; and
  • To promote journey time reductions, particularly by public transport, between the Aberdeen and the Central Belt primarily to allow business to achieve an effective working day when travelling between these centres.

Dundee

  • To reduce the conflict between longer distance and local traffic;
  • To improve bus/rail interchange opportunities;
  • To improve the public transport accessibility and competitiveness to Dundee West;
  • To promote continuing reduction in accident rates and severity rates across the strategic transport network; and
  • To promote journey time reductions, particularly by public transport, between Aberdeen and the Central Belt primarily to allow business to achieve an effective working day when travelling between these centres.

Edinburgh

  • To maintain the 60-minute commutable labour market area at the current level, with a particular focus on linking areas of economic activity;
  • To enhance public transport interchange opportunities, where feasible to do so;
  • To increase public transport capacity and frequency between Fife and Edinburgh;
  • To promote continuing reduction in accident rates and severity rates across the strategic transport network;
  • To promote journey time reductions, particularly by public transport, between the Central Belt and Aberdeen/Inverness primarily to allow business to achieve an effective working day when travelling between these centres; and
  • To promote efficient and effective transport links to support the development and implementation of the proposed national development at Edinburgh Airport identified in the National Planning Framework (NPF2).

Glasgow

  • To increase the public transport access to and between areas of economic activity and regeneration with minimal need for interchange;
  • To improve the efficiency of the M8 motorway during periods of peak demand with a focus on reducing the conflict between longer distance and local traffic, increasing the people carrying capacity and freight carrying capacity of existing road, and demand management;
  • To address rail capacity and connectivity issues in central Glasgow;
  • To promote continuing reduction in accident rates and severity rates across the strategic transport network;
  • To promote journey time reductions, particularly by public transport, between the Central Belt and Aberdeen/Inverness primarily to allow business to achieve an effective working day when travelling between these centres; and
  • To promote efficient and effective transport links to support the development and implementation of the proposed national development at Glasgow Airport identified in the NPF2.

Inverness

  • To reduce the conflict between longer distance and local traffic;
  • To improve connectivity, particularly by public transport between Inverness city centre and the growth area to the east including Inverness Airport;
  • To promote continuing reduction in accident rates and severity rates across the strategic transport network; and
  • To promote journey time reductions, particularly by public transport, between Inverness and the Central Belt primarily to allow business to achieve an effective working day when travelling between these centres.

Perth

  • To contribute to reducing the emissions per person kilometre;
  • To promote continuing reduction in accident rates and severity rates across the strategic transport network; and
  • To promote journey time reductions, particularly by public transport, between the Central Belt and Aberdeen/Inverness primarily to allow business to achieve an effective working day when travelling between these centres.

Corridor 1 — Inverness to Wick/Thurso and Northern Isles

  • To enhance public transport accessibility and reduce public transport journey time to and from Inverness; and
  • To reduce the fatal and severe accident rates to the national average or lower.

Corridor 2 — Inverness to Ullapool and Western Isles

  • To reduce the accident, fatal and severe rates to the national average.

Corridor 3 — Inverness to Fort William

  • To reduce the accident rate to current national average without adversely impacting on accident severity (see also Corridor 7).

Corridor 4 — Aberdeen to Inverness

  • To improve connectivity, particularly by public transport between Inverness city centre and the growth area to the east including Inverness Airport;
  • To improve journey time and increase opportunities to travel, particularly by public transport, between Aberdeen and Inverness; and
  • To reduce the accident rate and severity rate to current national average.

Corridor 5 — Dundee to Aberdeen

  • To improve the public transport competitiveness between Aberdeen and Dundee (and hence onwards to the Central Belt);
  • To contribute to reducing both overall emissions and emissions per person kilometre through providing for alternatives to road freight movement on the corridor;
  • To promote continuing reduction in accident rates and severity rates across the strategic transport network; and
  • To promote journey time reductions, particularly by public transport, between the Central Belt and Aberdeen primarily to allow business to achieve an effective working day when travelling between these centres.

Corridor 6 — Inverness to Perth

  • To reduce journey time and increase opportunities to travel between Inverness and Perth (and hence onwards to the Central Belt);
  • To improve the operational effectiveness of the A9 as it approaches Perth and Inverness;
  • To address issues of driver frustration relating to inconsistent road standard, with attention to reducing accident severity; and
  • To promote journey time reductions, particularly by public transport, between the Central Belt and Inverness primarily to allow business to achieve an effective working day when travelling between these centres.

Corridor 7 — Glasgow to Oban / Fort William

  • To provide improved road standards and overtaking opportunities; and
  • To reduce accident severity to the national average.

Corridor 8 — Aberdeen to North East Scotland and Northern Isles

  • To promote continuing reduction in accident rates and severity rates across the strategic transport network.

Corridor 9 — Glasgow to Perth

  • To address current and forecast rail overcrowding into Glasgow;
  • To improve the efficiency and reliability of the operation of the southern sections of the M80 on approach to Glasgow, particularly for priority vehicles;
  • To reduce the severity of accidents to the national average; and
  • To promote journey time reductions, particularly by public transport, between the Central Belt and Aberdeen/Inverness primarily to allow business to achieve an effective working day when travelling between these centres.

Corridor 10 — Edinburgh to Stirling

  • To improve access to Grangemouth port and freight hub;
  • To address shortfalls in the provision of public transport to and from Edinburgh and increase public transport modal share;
  • To promote continuing reduction in accident rates and severity rates across the strategic transport network; and
  • To promote efficient and effective transport links to support the development and implementation of the proposed national developments at Grangemouth and Edinburgh Airport identified in the NPF2.

Corridor 11 — Perth to Dundee

  • To promote continuing reduction in accident rates and severity rates across the strategic transport network; and
  • To promote journey time reductions, particularly by public transport, between the Central Belt and Aberdeen primarily to allow business to achieve an effective working day when travelling between these centres.

Corridor 12 — Edinburgh to Perth

  • To reduce Edinburgh to Perth public transport journey times and increase opportunities to travel by public transport;
  • To promote continuing reduction in accident rates and severity rates across the strategic transport network;
  • To promote journey time reductions between the Central Belt and Aberdeen/Inverness primarily to allow business to achieve an effective working day when travelling between these centres;
  • To promote efficient and effective transport links to support the development and implementation of the proposed national developments at the Forth Crossing and Edinburgh Airport identified in the NPF2; and
  • To improve the efficiency of the M90/A90 during periods of peak demand with a focus on reducing the conflict between longer distance and local traffic.

Corridor 13 — Glasgow to Edinburgh

  • To increase public transport capacity and reduce journey time between Edinburgh and Glasgow;
  • To make best use of the available road space and better manage peak demand;
  • To increase public transport capacity and frequency between Livingston and Edinburgh;
  • To contribute to both a reduction in emissions per person kilometre and a reduction in overall emissions;
  • To promote continuing reduction in accident rates and severity rates across the strategic transport network; and
  • To promote efficient and effective transport links to support the development and implementation of the proposed national developments at Grangemouth and Edinburgh Airport identified in the NPF2.

Corridor 14 — Edinburgh to Dundee

  • To reduce public transport journey time between Edinburgh and Dundee;
  • To increase public transport capacity and frequency between Fife and Edinburgh;
  • To promote journey time reductions between the Central Belt and Aberdeen/Inverness primarily to allow business to achieve an effective working day when travelling between these centres;
  • To promote efficient and effective transport links to support the development and implementation of the proposed national developments at the Forth Crossing and Edinburgh Airport identified in the NPF2;
  • To promote continuing reduction in accident rates and severity rates across the strategic transport network; and
  • To improve the efficiency of the M90/A90 during periods of peak demand with a focus on reducing the conflict between longer distance and local traffic.

Corridor 15 — Glasgow to Stranraer and South West

  • To increase rail capacity between Ayrshire and Glasgow including the Kilmarnock line;
  • To ensure efficient and effective freight access to the port facilities at Loch Ryan;
  • To promote continuing reduction in accident rates and severity rates across the strategic transport network; and
  • To reduce the conflict between longer distance and local traffic with a focus on identified key constraint points.

Corridor 16 — Stranraer to North West England

  • To ensure efficient and effective freight access to the port facilities at Loch Ryan; and
  • To promote continuing reduction in accident rates and severity rates across the strategic transport network.

Corridor 17 — Glasgow to Inverclyde and Islands

  • To increase capacity and reduce journey times by public transport between Glasgow and Inverclyde;
  • To facilitate freight access to Greenock port;
  • To improve the efficiency of the A8/M8 during periods of peak demand with a focus on reducing the conflict between longer distance and local traffic;
  • To reduce the accident rate to the national road type average on the M8 and A8; and
  • To promote efficient and effective transport links to support the development and implementation of the proposed national development at Glasgow Airport identified in the NPF2.

Corridor 18 — Glasgow to North West England and Beyond

  • To make best use of the available road space and better manage peak demand taking into account the need to contribute to emissions reduction;
  • To contribute to emissions reduction by facilitating an increase in the proportion of freight passing through the corridor that is carried by rail; and
  • To promote continuing reduction in accident rates and severity rates across the strategic transport network.

Corridor 19 — Edinburgh to North West England and Beyond

  • To promote continuing reduction in accident rates and severity rates across the strategic transport network.

Corridor 20 — Edinburgh to North East England and Beyond

  • To increase the attractiveness and capacity of public transport into Edinburgh to reduce crowding and forecast road congestion; and
  • To promote continuing reduction in accident rates and severity rates across the strategic transport network.

Identify Potential Interventions and Sift Options

B.9 This work package provided an initial assessment of some 2,000 potential transport interventions from a range of sources, to demonstrate their potential to meet the corridor / network and strategic transport objectives, and their consistency with overall government policy. The interventions developed took cognisance, where appropriate, of those interventions which had already been proposed in previous studies, such as the draft Regional Transport Strategies. This was supplemented by new proposals resulting from consultation with stakeholders and assessment of the issues in each corridor by professional transport planners and engineers.

B.10 The list of interventions generated was subject to an initial sifting process to ensure consistency with overarching National and corridor / network objectives. Those interventions which met these sifting criteria were grouped into appropriate packages where appropriate, particularly where more than one intervention was required to deliver a route based objective.

B.11 The output from this initial assessment was a list of approximately 150 potential interventions, some of which were expressed in very high level terms, reflecting their current stage of development. These were then taken forward for more detailed specification and appraisal.

Appraise Candidate Interventions

B.12 The purpose of this work package was to appraise the potential interventions which were brought forward from the initial option development and sifting. The appraisal used the methodologies and criteria in the Scottish Transport Appraisal Guidance (STAG) which are designed to measure the deliverability and feasibility of proposed interventions in the context of the policy, economic and transport objectives which they seek to address. STAG provides a rigorous process for testing proposals, and the key elements of the process are set out in Figure 1.1 of the STAG document44.

B.13 The Transport Model for Scotland was used to quantify the transport impact of the packages, providing a consistent appraisal tool within the STAG framework. The outputs of this work package provided the basis for the recommendations presented in this Summary Report.

Strategic Environmental Assessment

B.14 This work package provides a Strategic Environmental Assessment of the entire process, from the identification of the issues through to the appraisal of the interventions. The assessment provides further evidence to support the decision making process as to which interventions should be taken forward into this investment portfolio. In accordance with the Environmental Assessment (Scotland) Act 2005, the Environmental Report, produced as part of this work package has been subjected to a statutory consultation process, alongside the draft recommendations of the STPR.

B.15 A post adoption statement and supporting material have been published separately.